Oranj You Glad You’re Here?

The French are Les Bleus; the Brazilians samba to green and yellow; the Swedes were designed in blue and yellow; the Americans bleed red, white and blue; the Kiwis are All-Black; the Irish are an ode to kerry green; and the Chinese are red.

Graffiti makes light of gravity in Amsterdam, making its mark in orange. © Desiree Koh

The Dutch are orange, a nod to William the Silent, Prince of Orange, leader of the Protestant revolt in the Eighty Years’ War that led to independence from Spain in 1648. The feisty flamboyance of this hue that plays on the bright side flares on in Amsterdam, bringing along happy friends red, blue, yellow, pink, and green to the party that is murals, graffiti, art, and public design. The Dutch keep it inside, too – walk along any of the historical townhouses lining the canals and peek into the windows at decorations so vivid in color they overwhelm the pallor of the darker seasons – the Manhattanites and Parisians can have their black and the British their brown sauce, but the Hollanders levitate their spirits with tones on the higher end of the spectrum. Put it this way – Van Gogh painted “Sunflowers”, not “Lilies”.

The autumn leaves don their national colors. © Desiree Koh

This élan is everywhere in Amsterdam.

In the Dam, the medieval womb of the city where Amsterdam sprouted from a cluster of fishing boats in 1275, these waffles add fun to a fair on the square.

Rainbow bright. © Desiree Koh

Even Nieuwe Kerk – the New Church, only because it was built in the 15th century as opposed to Oude Kerk in 1306 – pops up in pink.

An Andy Warhol exhibit pretties Nieuwe Kerk up in pink. © Desiree Koh

Down in De Pijp, the city’s first 19th-century slum that is now its lively pipe dream of working class laborers, dreaming artists, new immigrants, old intellectuals, burgeoning bobos, and little cafes, Taart van m’n Tante puts Willy Wonka to shame with its princess-pleasing decor pumped with plum gobs of crazy pastels, its pastry case of pies, tarts and cakes so comforting that the most chiseled Stanley Kowalskis would flaunt his inner Barbie – and no one would bat an eyelash.

Everything you’d expect your favorite aunt’s kitchen to look like, filled with your favorite pies. © Desiree Koh

At the famous Bloemenmarkt, the “floating” flower market, a floral florescence surges down the arc of this part of the Singel canal, as you tip-toe through tulip bulbs that promise to bloom amid any doom and gloom. Here, budding gardeners can kick-start Versailles-worthy lawns with seed money – 50 different flowers with just 10 euros – and fingers seasoned with green can Mother Nurture flowers that look like anything from purple astroids to magenta starfish.

Flower power at Amsterdam’s Bloemenmarkt. © Desiree Koh

Even at night, rather than conceding to the darkening sky and shadows lurking in the alleys, luminous glows cut their ways across canals and bridges, lingering in the trail of boats and bicycles with an authoritative aura. It’s funny – it could be a starless night, but everything is glittering in the water, which seems less murky in dusk than during the day.

Moonlight serenade in Amsterdam’s canals. © Desiree Koh

And at Olympic Stadium, the start and end of the Amsterdam Marathon, everyone will be walking on sunshine once they cross that 26.2-mile (42.195-kilometer) line. There will be people from 85 countries making the final victory lap to a glossy finish – no matter how much the Dutch love their oranj, a single color can only go solo for so far. It will be a United Nations indeed, and these colors will run.

We can’t all be Olympians, but anyone can be a marathon runner. © Desiree Koh

This post is courtesy of CheapTickets.sg. All editorial views remain mine and unbiased.

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